The Business of Artistic Fashion

July 24, 2013 at 2:18 am

Artistic FashionFashion is more than an artistic statement, it’s a business. As the era begins, the fashion industry is ruled by the dictates of Paris couturiers. However, many couture houses in Paris found themselves in financial difficulties in the 1950s. With an ever-dwindling client base, haute couture must reinvent itself or parish. Couturiers must become businessmen, not just designers, and broaden their reach to a new middle-class audience to remain profitable. Couturiers expand into ready-to-wear garment and licensed products, such as hosiery, neck wear, jewelry, and cosmetics, exchanging their name for profits. Profits made from licensing agreements and mass-produced ready-to-wear garments help sustain haute couture, especially in the “Big ‘80s” when conspicuous consumption reigned.

The growth of the middle class during this period expanded the demand for ready-made clothing. The active American lifestyle demanded clothing that moved. American designers stepped up to the challenge, reinterpreting Paris fashions for the American woman and man. One such example is the brand Tom Ford Cologne found here. Although women might always turn to Paris for overall style, especially in formal wear, over this fifty-year period, they increasingly turned to American designers for their “daywear,” known now as sportswear.

American designers also discovered a new market in the 1950s: children. The post-WWII baby boom resulted in an unprecedented birth rate and a new demand for children’s wear that was unique, not miniaturized versions of adult clothing. As the decades progress, the children’s market was further segmented in preteen, teen, and college markets, each with its own look.

The expansion of retail operations, both high-end department stores and mass merchandisers, promoted the American vision of fashion. As manufacturing techniques improved and sizing became standardized, the quality of ready-to-wear clothing improved drastically over the course of the decade. The rapid production and distribution methods also meant that a new fashion trend, once only available to the elite, could now be instantly reproduced at all price points. The same fashion trends could be found at Chanel, Macy’s, Banana Republic, Old Navy, and Wal-Mart simultaneously.

The fashion industry, like any good business, also learned the importance of targeting its audience. Whether it was the Mickey Mouse Club in 1955 or MTV’s House of Style launched in 1989, fashion used the new medium of television to promote its message. The most forward promoters were also quick to adopt cable television (The Home Shopping Network) and the Internet to reach their audiences twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Advertisers also utilize TV shows and movies with sites like watch-movies.net. Additionally, shoppers are increasingly being targeted by mobile and other online retailers. More information regarding these marketing plans can be located at Hotmail customer support, Comcast phone number, and  Safelink contact number.

Fashion is increasingly ready whenever, wherever shoppers live.