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The Art Trade: A Complex Industry

July 24, 2013 at 6:17 am

Art IndustryIf you’ve ever purchased a piece of art, a painting, or maybe even a sculpture, you’ve probably wondered how that piece got from the artist to your local art gallery. It’s possible that the artist who’s work you purchased, was a local artist, who placed his or her piece in the local shop on consignment. This means he or she will only be paid if and when their piece is sold. If however you’ve purchased a piece of art from a popular or well collected artist it’s likely come from a larger art gallery who carries many pieces which have been collected and purchased over many years. There are many stops for a piece of art from the artist to the gallery. We’ve decided to explore the many stops in this complex process to give you a better understanding of journey your piece of art might have taken.

The Artist’s Studio

This is where all the magic happens, the inspired artist, energized by organic protein shake recipes from this site, works diligently and passionately, for nights on end to produce an amazing piece of art. Working madly from the inside of their garage, with only a few garage door parts standing between them and the outside world, they balance on the edge of insanity producing their heart’s desires and dreams. This, they do all for your personal entertainment and intrigue. Many artists choose to purchase or rent lofts with large open open spaces large enough to house several working projects at once.

Focus of the Piece 

The interest and intent of the artist’s piece can range from Christmas tree ornaments to painting vehicles. One artist we encountered only paints vehicles, his specialty being Jeep Wranglers. After tedious and detailed artwork is applied to the vehicles exterior he puts up these Jeep Wranglers for sale online here at a huge markup and makes a great living. The same artist, keeping a focus on vehicles makes various sculptures from a variety of car tires. At the time we visited his studio he had recently maxed out his tires plus credit card found here purchasing just over thirty over-sized off-road tires. A few months after our visit we learned that these oversized tires were eventually melted together into a tower over 100 ft. tall, which the artist later sold for over five hundred thousand dollars. That’s quite a nice return on investment!

Dealers and Transportation

Dealers are the glue that keeps the Art industry together. Ok, so I’m a little biased being a dealer myself. At the least we can say that we’re an integral part of the industry. We spend time to learn about and visit all the up and coming artists to get a sense of the work they are completing at any given time, and to connect these artists with clients who may be interested in purchasing their work. These buyers could be gallery’s, or foundations, and in some cases they are actually just individual art collectors. After making the connection, it’s the dealer’s job to broker the deal for the art at a “wholesale” price. Now, depending upon the popularity of the artist’s works, and/or the number of years they have received recognition in the industry, this “wholesale” price can be quite pricey.

Art Sales

Finally after a back and forth negotiation with the artist on one side, the buyer on the other, and the dealer/broker in the middle, the buyer receives the art. Often the buyer purchases a large number of pieces from a given artist in order to put them all on display at a genre-specific event. These events can be exclusive to one artist, or may include pieces from a number of different artists, generally producing similarly styled work. Most artists who have gathered a following and made a name for themselves in the art world sell only their work in a given exhibit. Others are “headliners” so to speak, but allow others to sell their works as well, and take a commission from the sales of any of their works as well.

Having taken the full journey, you’ve now been given insight into the life cycle of a piece of art. It’s likely next time you make the trip down to your local art gallery you’ll see just how much goes into allowing you to purchase your cherished works of art.

The Business of Artistic Fashion

July 24, 2013 at 2:18 am

Artistic FashionFashion is more than an artistic statement, it’s a business. As the era begins, the fashion industry is ruled by the dictates of Paris couturiers. However, many couture houses in Paris found themselves in financial difficulties in the 1950s. With an ever-dwindling client base, haute couture must reinvent itself or parish. Couturiers must become businessmen, not just designers, and broaden their reach to a new middle-class audience to remain profitable. Couturiers expand into ready-to-wear garment and licensed products, such as hosiery, neck wear, jewelry, and cosmetics, exchanging their name for profits. Profits made from licensing agreements and mass-produced ready-to-wear garments help sustain haute couture, especially in the “Big ‘80s” when conspicuous consumption reigned.

The growth of the middle class during this period expanded the demand for ready-made clothing. The active American lifestyle demanded clothing that moved. American designers stepped up to the challenge, reinterpreting Paris fashions for the American woman and man. One such example is the brand Tom Ford Cologne found here. Although women might always turn to Paris for overall style, especially in formal wear, over this fifty-year period, they increasingly turned to American designers for their “daywear,” known now as sportswear.

American designers also discovered a new market in the 1950s: children. The post-WWII baby boom resulted in an unprecedented birth rate and a new demand for children’s wear that was unique, not miniaturized versions of adult clothing. As the decades progress, the children’s market was further segmented in preteen, teen, and college markets, each with its own look.

The expansion of retail operations, both high-end department stores and mass merchandisers, promoted the American vision of fashion. As manufacturing techniques improved and sizing became standardized, the quality of ready-to-wear clothing improved drastically over the course of the decade. The rapid production and distribution methods also meant that a new fashion trend, once only available to the elite, could now be instantly reproduced at all price points. The same fashion trends could be found at Chanel, Macy’s, Banana Republic, Old Navy, and Wal-Mart simultaneously.

The fashion industry, like any good business, also learned the importance of targeting its audience. Whether it was the Mickey Mouse Club in 1955 or MTV’s House of Style launched in 1989, fashion used the new medium of television to promote its message. The most forward promoters were also quick to adopt cable television (The Home Shopping Network) and the Internet to reach their audiences twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Advertisers also utilize TV shows and movies with sites like watch-movies.net. Additionally, shoppers are increasingly being targeted by mobile and other online retailers. More information regarding these marketing plans can be located at Hotmail customer support, Comcast phone number, and  Safelink contact number.

Fashion is increasingly ready whenever, wherever shoppers live.

Freedom of expression land you in jail?: Get the right help.

July 23, 2013 at 2:21 am

Artist in JailEveryone has an opinion and, hopefully, the freedom to express that opinion. Speech or various artistic forms of expression are bound to have opponents and sometimes it can have unfortunate consequences. In the United States, we are protected by the first amendment which gives the freedom of speech/expression. However, there are still limitations and these limitations go by the names of libel and slander. Libel is defamation by print or another other form other than spoken word or gestures. Slander is an untruth about someone spoken with malicious intent. Art comes in many different forms, whether it be a street performer or Picasso, and any time a piece of art is made it comes with the implication that someone may possibly be offended by the message. A street artist in New York was arrested for placing ads on bus stops that poked fun at the NYPD by saying “Drones: Protection When You Least Expect It”. He was arrested by the police, which the irony is not lost on, but proves that there are limits to how far an individual’s freedom of expression goes.

Other examples of art having bad consequences: an American photographer created a controversial photo entitled “Piss Christ” which depicted Jesus on the cross submerged in a bottle of urine. The photograph elicited controversy for decades.  Another artist by the name of Anna Sin’kova, a resident of Ukraine, was found frying eggs over an eternal flame that burns in remembrance of fallen soldiers and the Soviet victory over Nazi Germany. A video of the act exists and reveals that there are police officers watching Anna perform the stunt, but did not try to stop here. However, three months later she was arrested for “desecrating a grave.” She was refused to be released on bail.

Sin’kova says that she sees the placement not as a grave, but a “propaganda for a totalitarian communist regime.” To her, the old memorial does not resonate the same way it does with others. There are those that do agree with her, however, and see her actions as acceptable within the rights of her expression and have raised their voices in her defense. She says that upon her return from jail she will fight for the causes she believes in. If she wasn’t prohibited from being released on bail she might have been able to get back to that cause sooner. Unfortunately, bail can be denied for a variety of reasons in different countries. If bail is denied, the defendant is allowed to apply for bail at their court hearing. Unless there is a strong reason to deny bail, the defendant will be released. If an artist is arrested after putting a piece of their work on display they should seek bail, especially if they feel that they were wrongly accused of libel or slander for their work.

Having a lawyer that can successfully defend your case using the amendment rights will help ensure the case swings in you favor. In the unfortunate event that you have been arrested, keep calm and know that you have rights protecting you, but don’t rely on your rights alone. In order to ensure that you’re out of jail in time to prepare your case with a qualified defense attorney, you need to choose the right bail bonds company to secure your freedom. This isn’t as easy as it sounds. You need to focus on finding a bail bondsman who is both trustworthy and nearby. If you call one bail bonds company, and they tell you they will be there shortly to bail you out, and never show up, it could mean several more days in jail before you can get ahold of another and make your way out. Many times, it’s family members making these phone calls on your behalf, you need a qualified bail bondsman to get the job done. With regard to their being nearby, lets say for the sake of argument that your loved one was arrested and brought to jail in Los Angles. If they call a bail bonds in Whittier, or Orange County bail bonds, such as ChiefBail.com, they can usually be there in about an hour to get them bailed out. If on the other hand you reach a San Diego bail bonds company, it could literally take hours for them to arrive.

Above all, don’t make the mistake of taking you or your loved one’s arrest lightly. It’s a serious event when anyone is arrested, and even more serious when someone’s freedom of expression rights are being trampled on. Take the right steps post-arrest to ensure you or your loved ones are bailed out and on the path to justice as soon as possible.

The Vibrant Art and Culture of The 60′s

June 20, 2013 at 10:10 pm

60's ArtAs with many parts of society, art in the 1960s was characterized by a reaction to the popular styles of the previous decade and a radical departure from the status quo. Nowhere is this pattern more evident than in the pop art movement. Claes Oldenburg, Allan Kaprow, Lucas Samaras, and Andy Warhol were some of the influential artists that aspired to blur the lines between art and life. The first three helped popularize “happenings,” which combined the visual arts, performance, and audience participation. Yoko Ono’s “Cut Piece,” for example, involved members of the audience cutting away parts of her clothing with scissors. Andy Warhol, along with Roy Lichtenstein and others, co-opted images from popular culture and society to comment on the disposability of consumerism. Warhol’s famous silk screens of Campbell’s soup cans, Marilyn Monroe, and Jackie Kennedy, and Lichtenstein’s use of cartoon and comic styles are just some examples.

Moreover, pop artists, in contrast to their predecessors, not only understood the power of mass media but also eagerly courted it. The impact was twofold: people who were not normally interested in art were exposed to the works of these artists (thus bypassing New York’s art critics), and the artists became well known in their own right. Andy Warhol was able to branch out into films (“Sleep” consisted of six hours of a person sleeping) and multimedia events, such as his work with Nico and the Velvet Underground, a Greenwich Village art rock band.

On the heels of pop art came minimalism, an additional deconstruction of the concept of what constitutes art. Painters such as Frank Stella, Robert Mangold, and Al Held produced works that were characterized by very simple lines and colors; in some cases, just one color on a canvas. In the area of sculpture, minimalism used works that utilized geometric shapes and repetition of simple themes. Often the emphasis of minimalist art was to challenge the audience’s perception of the work against its surroundings. Donald Judd, for instance, had an installation of hollow concrete boxes placed around and throughout a small town in Texas.

Eccentric abstraction and anti-form continued the deconstruction of the traditional concept of art. The former used flexible materials to form curved shapes and stressed the visceral, sensual reaction to the pieces (Phillips 1999 , 181). Anti-form used lead, rubber, neon, and other components; sometimes the pieces were so large that they could not be housed in galleries. The Earthworks movement was the next logical step in the progression. Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty was a 1,500-foot rock pathway constructed in a lake in Utah. Christo and Jeanne-Claude covered more than 1 million square feet of coastline in Sydney, Australia, with fabric. For obvious reasons, photographs became the only surviving representation of these works. Toward the end of the decade, conceptual art, which often combined text with painting or sculpture, refocused the emphasis on the art itself rather than the spectacle surrounding it.

The government played an important role in the art world during the 1960s by dedicating funds to the cause. JFK instituted a program to commission mosaics, tapestries, and sculpture for new federal buildings. LBJ championed legislation to create the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, both important organizations in the support of artists.

Music

The 1960s was one of the most creative, exciting periods in popular music. The early part of the decade was dominated by the emergence of Berry Gordy’s Motown Records, featuring such acts as Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, the Supremes, Marvin Gaye, the Temptations, and Martha and the Vandellas. These groups appealed to white and black audiences alike and were major influences on the white bands that would follow them up the pop charts. Beyond Motown, Sam Cooke was fusing the sacred and the secular to forge a sound that would be dubbed soul music. After Cooke’s death in 1964, Otis Redding and Aretha Franklin emerged as the major artists in this vein. Redding benefited greatly from exposure to white audiences at the Fillmore West and the Monterey Pop Festival, and Franklin’s version of “Respect” was a massive hit with all audiences. By the end of the decade, soul was giving way to funk music, with James Brown and Sly and the Family Stone leading the way.

For many, the arrival of the Beatles to the United States in 1964 was the event that marked the beginning of modern rock ‘n’ roll. The group became a pop culture phenomenon with the help of television and feature films. Not only was their music revolutionary, but so was their appearance. The mod look, cultivated in London, was imported to America along with the Beatles. Men wore their hair longer, slim tapered pants, multicolored striped jackets, velvet jackets, and ankle boots, and women wore mini-skirts to signify their approval of the new sound and distinguish themselves from their parents’ generation.

Their success paved the way for the bands of the British Invasion, including the Rolling Stones, the Who, and the Kinks. At the same time, the Beach Boys’ songs about surfing, cars, and girls helped introduce the rest of the country to the California aesthetic. To distinguish themselves from the mods and the rockers, the casual, easy-going surfer look focused on board shorts, Hawaiian print shirts, and sandals with tousled blond hair.

By mid-decade, the West Coast, and specifically San Francisco, was percolating with a mix of social, musical, and pharmaceutical elements that helped push the boundaries even further. The psychedelic sound, exemplified by Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin, and the Doors, and characterized by drug use (particularly LSD [for lysergic acid diethylamide]) spread across the country and had a great impact on the appearance and attitude of adolescents. The festivals of the late 1960s, most notably the Monterey Pop Festival, Woodstock, and Altamont (and the subsequent movies that chronicled these events), cemented the sound and image of rock music into the public’s consciousness. The eclectic ethnic hippie look deepened the generation gap, sending an immediately identifiable visual message to the establishment. Blue jeans, long hair, beads, and peasant tops that captured the Eastern philosophies were the wardrobe of the counterculture as people “tuned out” of the commercial mass-produced world and “tuned in” to nature.

Art Movements and Trends

June 19, 2013 at 10:47 pm

Art TrendsFashion, art, and entertainment have a direct, almost symbiotic relationship. Trends in art, movies, television, and music all influence fashion, either directly or indirectly. Conversely, without fashion, the themes in art, movies, television, and music would be missing a vital communication vehicle. Furthermore, through movies and television, not only are fashion trends introduced, but they are launched virtually simultaneously around the world. Additionally, the advent of the internet has also helped move fashion forward. By utilizing shopify themes here, creative minds can market and sell creative designs online.

In art, artists broke away from accepted conventions in both technique and subject matter. Abstract expressionism, op art, pop art, minimalism, and postmodernism formed the new vocabulary of art through the last half of the twentieth century. The shapes, forms, colors, and textures of each movement were reflected in the fashions of each era. The optical illusions of op art were translated into textile designs for the “psychedelic ‘60s.” The pop art movement not only elevated Campbell’s soup cans to art but opened the door for the placement of logos, such as Guinness beer, and cartoon characters, such as Beavis and Butthead, on T-shirts. Other logos and products such as Jaguar, Jeep Brute (jeepbrute.com) or Wrangler hard top appear in movies.

The twentieth century also saw the birth of rock ‘n’ roll and its many genres: funk, punk, new wave, heavy metal, mod, glam, and disco. Through rock ‘n’ roll, in all its forms, youths created a generational gap that angered their parents and the establishment. Each genre, whether punk or new wave, metal or disco, rock or folk, had its costume to visually convey messages and identify subscribers. If hippies had dressed in suits and ties instead of donning jeans, T-shirts, and long hair, would their anti establishment message have been heard?

Television was perhaps the greatest communication tool of the twentieth century. From Elvis performing on The Ed Sullivan Show to the moon landing, from the assassination of a president to the shooting of J. R. Ewing, from the Vietnam War to the unification of Germany, every celebration and every tragedy was broadcast for the world to see. When JFK did not wear a hat for his inauguration, the world took note and did the same. When Don Johnson wore shoes without socks on Miami Vice, again the world took note and did the same.

Movies repeatedly told the stories of our hopes, our fears, and our conflicts, reflected changes in women’s roles, and got us all dancing. Cold War espionage played out in James Bond films, the impact of the Vietnam War was depicted in The Deer Hunter, the hippie revolution was recorded in the Woodstock documentary, and the rise of corporate America can be seen in Wall Street. Films such as Desk Set, Working Girl, and Baby Boom reflected women’s ever-evolving role as wife, mother, and employee, whereas movies such as Beach Blanket Bingo, Saturday Night Fever, and Flashdance launched dance crazes as well as fashion trends. Whether leisure suits, power suits, or leg warmers, movies helped us learn what to wear. Additionally, toys and dolls such as american girl coupons found here also contributed to fashion and trends.